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Articles tagged with: Theological Reflections

Luther and the Freeing Word
June 15, 2017 – 7:29 am | No Comment
Luther and the Freeing Word

by Erik M. Heen

The characteristic Lutheran “spirituality” centered in service to the neighbor, often expressed in the slogan “freed to serve,” is succinctly articulated in Luther’s 1520 treatise “Freedom of the Christian.” The slogan raises fundamental questions: “How are we freed?” “From what are we freed?” and “How is it that ‘service’ most characterizes freedom?” Luther concludes that though the “Word” is the means God uses to liberate humanity from Sin, “faith” is the agent that moves the focus of one’s attention off of self and on to one’s neighbor-in-need.

Subject to None
June 15, 2017 – 7:28 am | No Comment
Subject to None

by Petra Carlsson Redell

In this article, Rev. Doc. Petra Carlsson Redell reflects over two Lutheran ideas, namely the Lutheran notion of grace and the idea of the priesthood of all believers. Redell suggests that if these notions are treated with care, they may help us spread the love of God and the inspiration of the Spirit in the political and social reality of our time.

Exploring Paradoxical Christian Freedom in 2017
June 15, 2017 – 7:27 am | No Comment
Exploring Paradoxical Christian Freedom in 2017

by Jonathan Linman

Rooted in a robust, nuanced, and expansive understanding of Christian freedom, Martin Luther’s famous paradox, paraphrased as “subject to none, subject to all,” forms the foundation for Lutheran social ethics which continue to resonate with profound relevance in our day, five hundred years after the beginning of the Reformation.

Liberty: Finding and Maintaining Our Voice
June 15, 2017 – 7:26 am | No Comment
Liberty: Finding and Maintaining Our Voice

by Donald L. Odom

Does Christian liberty suggest our freedom in Christ allows us to be passive concerning the least, last and the lost? What is our responsibility as Christians towards the disinherited and disenfranchised, and what does Christ’s love look like when we remain silent while others around us struggle? Christian liberty requires work within the Body of Christ to speak loudly and recurrently for the invisible and voiceless.

Two Minds, One Voice, One Prayer: Martin Luther and Johann Sebastian Bach
June 15, 2017 – 7:25 am | No Comment
Two Minds, One Voice, One Prayer: Martin Luther and Johann Sebastian Bach

by Jill Schaeffer

This essay suggests how the works of two deeply faithful and creative men, born two centuries apart, may generate a single act of worship. Martin Luther’s commentary on The Lord’s Prayer is joined wordlessly with Johann Sebastian Bach’s chorale on The Lord’s Prayer in the Clavier-Übung, more commonly known as The German Organ Mass. Luther’s influence on Bach’s music was pervasive and indelible. This particular influence on Bach’s compositions is well timed with Reformation celebrations in the town of Eisenach in 1739.

Preaching and Teaching the Reformation in 2017
June 15, 2017 – 7:24 am | No Comment
Preaching and Teaching the Reformation in 2017

by Douglas S. Stivison

The Protestant Reformation not only changed forever the course of Christian belief and worship, it also elevated respect for individual conscience and honest inquiry. To preach faithfully in a contemporary Protestant pulpit demands that we help our parishioners appreciate the priceless and revolutionary concept that is the foundation of Reformed worship – freedom of conscience.

An Introduction and Examination of Isaiah 11
March 1, 2017 – 9:29 pm | No Comment
An Introduction and Examination of Isaiah 11

by Cleotha Robertson

Occurring against the backdrop of King Ahaz’s reign from 732 to 715 BCE, Isa. 11 is the hopeful prophecy of a Davidic Ruler who will arise from the lineage of Jesse. This Davidic ruler will fear the Lord, practice justice, establish peace, slay the wicked, and restore the oppressed remnant of Judah and Israel. For the Body of Christ, this prophecy is and will be fulfilled in our Lord and Savior Christ Jesus!

Lasting Shalom: A Word from Isaiah and Jeremiah
March 1, 2017 – 9:28 pm | No Comment
Lasting <em>Shalom</em>: A Word from Isaiah and Jeremiah

by John W. Herbst

We live in an age of distrust, far from Isaiah’s ideal. Individually and collectively, people seek security. The church needs to promote Isaiah’s solutions to local and global disharmony: concentration on God’s ways and values, and the promotion of justice for all people, everywhere. It is only in knowledge and justice that our society will experience true shalom.

The Challenges of a Life of Faith
December 1, 2016 – 12:12 am | Comments Off on The Challenges of a Life of Faith
The Challenges of a Life of Faith

by Åke Viberg

“…When we know we cannot know everything and that we will soon die, what do we do?” It’s usually a painful experience to realize that we are limited beings forced to make some tough decisions in order to adapt to this very sobering realization. In the end however, we must face life as it is, and change.

The Paradox of Breathing
December 1, 2016 – 12:08 am | Comments Off on The Paradox of Breathing
The Paradox of Breathing

by William J. Sappenfield

Breathing readily illustrates the nature of paradox in our relationship with God. Breathing is the climax of God’s creation of humans in Genesis 2 and it is Jesus’ means of commissioning his disciples in John 20. But God slipped a paradox into creation to give us a reminder of how our relationship with God is maintained.

Exposé
August 2, 2016 – 12:09 pm | Comments Off on Exposé
Exposé

by the Editorial Team of The Living Pulpit

The story of cosmic and Earth evolution drawing on the latest scientific knowledge, in a way that makes it both relevant and moving. What emerges is an intensely poetic story, which evokes emotions of awe and excitement, fear and joy, belonging and responsibility.

Recreation in Ezekiel 36
March 9, 2016 – 10:50 pm | Comments Off on Recreation in Ezekiel 36
Recreation in Ezekiel 36

by John W. Herbst

The most fundamental of Old Testament ideas is Yahweh as Creator. The concept of Yahweh as creator points obviously to God’s omnipotence and rightful place as ruler of the universe. For people of the Old Testament however, Yahweh’s role as creator implies the power to “recreate,” that is, to restore that which is barren and lifeless.