Greetings From the Editor
December 1, 2016 – 12:01 am | No Comment

by Jin Hee Han

For the winter issue of 2016, we present a collection of articles and book reviews focused upon the theme of “BREATHING.” This year we were presented with a series of challenges, but the Lord provided for us exactly what we needed to continue this important ministry. Help from the Lord came through like the precious supply of breath in ways that we could recognize right away as God’s gracious intervention.

Our authors highlight God’s mysterious and wondrous work we encounter in the Bible, the life of the church, and the world in modern days. As the Johannine Jesus points out, “The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes” (John 3:8). Commentators immediately add that the Greek word for the “wind” is pneuma, and that it also means “spirit” (as in the Holy Spirit). The Spirit of the living God takes us where we may not have anticipated, but the upshot of the journey is always the manifestation of God’s goodness.

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Mission Connectivity: A Tale of Two Cities
November 19, 2015 – 11:40 pm | Comments Off on Mission Connectivity: A Tale of Two Cities
Mission Connectivity: A Tale of Two Cities

by Kevin Yoho

Do you believe that anything is possible? Pastors and church leaders in very diverse ministries consistently tell me they want to make a difference in their community. Many do, but others retreat into their sanctuaries when unexpected obstacles and challenges arise.

Connectivity: Acts 17
November 19, 2015 – 11:39 pm | Comments Off on Connectivity: Acts 17
Connectivity: Acts 17

by C. H. Elijah Sadaphal

Connection is defined as “a relationship in which a person, thing, or idea is linked or associated with something else.” From a theological perspective, the Holy Spirit is connected to Creator, Who is connected to Christ, Who is connected to the Holy Spirit. The Connectivity and subsequent relationality within and amongst the Holy Trinity is what allows salvation.

A Longing for Connectivity
November 19, 2015 – 11:38 pm | Comments Off on A Longing for Connectivity
A Longing for Connectivity

by Insook Lee

We have shifted from the industrial age to the digital age of connectivity. Some people welcome the sense of connection beyond time and space while others are ambivalent and fearful of “techno-colonialism” and a “global cyberimperialism.” Whatever the consequences of digital connectivity are, “internet access springs from a powerful longing for community—the very same force that drives church congregations.”

Preaching That Shapes The Body of Christ
November 19, 2015 – 11:37 pm | Comments Off on Preaching That Shapes The Body of Christ
Preaching That Shapes The Body of Christ

by David A. Davis

Many preachers have experienced that moment of paralysis when they stand before a congregation yearning to hear Biblical truth just before the sermon. For many pastors that view of the congregation comes with the knowledge of the overwhelming, collective pastoral need. But by God’s grace and in the mystery of the Holy Spirit, we believe the Gospel strikes to the heart of the people of God.

Rejection and Hope: Jeremiah’s Distinctive Vision for a Future Davidic King
November 19, 2015 – 11:36 pm | Comments Off on Rejection and Hope: Jeremiah’s Distinctive Vision for a Future Davidic King
Rejection and Hope: Jeremiah’s Distinctive Vision for a Future Davidic King

by Melvin Sensenig

Jeremiah 21:1–23:4 recounts a series of oracles against the last four kings in Israel. The canonical book’s reordering of the final four kings is important to the overall argument of the book about the future of the Davidic kingship. No future king can arise without the complete destruction of the current Davidic line.

Book Review: Homiletical Theology: Preaching as Doing Theology; Edited by David Schnasa Jacobsen
November 19, 2015 – 11:34 pm | Comments Off on Book Review: Homiletical Theology: Preaching as Doing Theology; Edited by David Schnasa Jacobsen
Book Review: Homiletical Theology: Preaching as Doing Theology; Edited by David Schnasa Jacobsen

Reviewed by Neal D. Presa

This book is the first volume in “The Promise of Homiletical Theology” series as part of the Homiletical Theology section in the Academy of Homiletics. Boston University homiletics scholar, David Schnasa Jacobsen, collaborated with six other homileticians in describing the multivalent relationships of preaching, preaching preparation and theology. At its core, the volume asserts that every part of the preaching craft is engaged in theology and is itself theological by definition because the subject, object, and predicate of preaching is God.

Book Review: Faith, Freedom, and the Spirit: The Economic Trinity in Barth, Torrance and Contemporary Theology by Paul D. Molnar
November 19, 2015 – 11:33 pm | Comments Off on Book Review: Faith, Freedom, and the Spirit: The Economic Trinity in Barth, Torrance and Contemporary Theology by Paul D. Molnar
Book Review: Faith, Freedom, and the Spirit: The Economic Trinity in Barth, Torrance and Contemporary Theology by Paul D. Molnar

Reviewed by Neal D. Presa

To know oneself, one must have a proper understanding of God. Or to put it simply: the true identity of God leads to true identity of who we are, whose we are, and what we are to be and to do. For the task and craft of preaching the identity of God is critical, essential, and pivotal. Paul Molnar applies Barth’s theology of the Trinity and election, and then uses the thoughts of one of Barth’s students, the late reformed theologian, Thomas F. Torrance, to bring clarity to Barth’s thoughts on the matter, and to provide a corrective to contemporary theologies.

Quotations from Scripture and Other Writings Related to Connectivity
November 19, 2015 – 11:32 pm | Comments Off on Quotations from Scripture and Other Writings Related to Connectivity
Quotations from Scripture and Other Writings Related to Connectivity

selected by Darla Turlington

Here are quotations from the Bible and from secular writings that pastors and others may find useful in sermons, essays, or other venues.

Greetings From the Editor
November 19, 2015 – 11:31 pm | Comments Off on Greetings From the Editor
Greetings From the Editor

by Jin Hee Han

The current issue showcases how the modern thrust of CONNECTIVITY may get into a delightful conversation with traditional theological affirmations, such as the incarnation as God connecting with us. As we browse through this issue, we will encounter witnesses to the reign of God, who guides us through messy confusion that has become all too common in human history.

What Do Nineveh and Jerusalem Have in Common?
August 17, 2015 – 2:09 pm | Comments Off on What Do Nineveh and Jerusalem Have in Common?
What Do Nineveh and Jerusalem Have in Common?

by Jin H. Han

Many will recognize the question as a parody of Tertullian, De praescriptione haereticorum, chapter 7: “What does Athens have to do with Jerusalem?” So, to answer our question, we must first ask, “What does Jerusalem represent?”

“Heavenly Citizenship” at Philipi and the “Four Towns” of Senegal West Africa
August 17, 2015 – 2:08 pm | Comments Off on “Heavenly Citizenship” at Philipi and the “Four Towns” of Senegal West Africa
“Heavenly Citizenship” at Philipi and the “Four Towns” of Senegal West Africa

by Aiou C. Niang

Starting about 1649, French colonialists in Africa attempted to infuse French culture to the native inhabitants of Dakar, Goree, Rufisque, and Saint Louis in order to assimilate French language and culture—to “Frenchify” them. This notion was meant to imitate the experiences of ancient Greece where citizenship was conferred on those born in Greece and therefore superior to non-citizens in recognition and rights. France’s goal was to spread its culture and Christianity, much as St Paul had done with the building of Christian churches and communities.

The Mighty City and the Holy City: John’s Apocalypse at the Intersections of Power and Praise
August 17, 2015 – 2:07 pm | One Comment
The Mighty City and the Holy City: John’s Apocalypse at the Intersections of Power and Praise

by Jean-Pierre Ruiz

The author presents the point that John sets before his audience visions of two imagined cities, one the mighty city that was a distant presence looming large through its local surrogates in Asia, the other a holy city descended from above. He urges them to choose between them, to decide their allegiance. This decision is a matter of who is the proper object of worship: the emperor or the Christ. John positions his readers at the intersection of power and praise.