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Articles in Theological Reflections

What Do Nineveh and Jerusalem Have in Common?
August 17, 2015 – 2:09 pm | No Comment
What Do Nineveh and Jerusalem Have in Common?

by Jin H. Han

Many will recognize the question as a parody of Tertullian, De praescriptione haereticorum, chapter 7: “What does Athens have to do with Jerusalem?” So, to answer our question, we must first ask, “What does Jerusalem represent?”

The Mighty City and the Holy City: John’s Apocalypse at the Intersections of Power and Praise
August 17, 2015 – 2:07 pm | No Comment
The Mighty City and the Holy City: John’s Apocalypse at the Intersections of Power and Praise

by Jean-Pierre Ruiz

The author presents the point that John sets before his audience visions of two imagined cities, one the mighty city that was a distant presence looming large through its local surrogates in Asia, the other a holy city descended from above. He urges them to choose between them, to decide their allegiance. This decision is a matter of who is the proper object of worship: the emperor or the Christ. John positions his readers at the intersection of power and praise.

Birthing the True Self
November 1, 2014 – 5:08 pm | One Comment
Birthing the True Self

by Karla M. Kincannon

A midwife tells mothers that there are three things they need to know about labor. “It’s hard work, it hurts a lot, and you can do it.” That’s good advice for those on the Christian journey. The birth of the true self into the world requires effort and openness to God’s grace. We each have a true self, a deeper identity that lives in the heart of God and is united to God in Christ.

Endurance: Legacy of the African-American Christian Experience
August 1, 2014 – 1:51 pm | One Comment
Endurance: Legacy of the African-American Christian Experience

by Reginald Brantley

One of the great ironies of Christian history in America is that slave masters taught their black slaves a racialist form of Christianity, hoping to keep them docile, but instead the story of the Exodus taught them that the God who rescued the Hebrew slaves and brought them out of Egypt was their God of liberation. Men like Demark Vesey and Nat Turner preached a liberation theology that rescued America from its baser self.

Healing: Psychological and Theological Perspectives
May 1, 2014 – 12:13 am | Comments Off on Healing: Psychological and Theological Perspectives
Healing: Psychological and Theological Perspectives

by Insook Lee

Many health care professionals consider religion and spirituality essential components in a holistic approach to health; many religious leaders recognize the benefits of using scientific and psychological perspectives to assess and treat specific symptoms. Here the author suggests ways for pastors to engage in dialog and treatment with health professionals.

Compassion to Heal the World
May 1, 2014 – 12:08 am | Comments Off on Compassion to Heal the World
Compassion to Heal the World

by Mary Foulke

Sympathy and compassion are related, however, sympathy is more a feeling whereas compassion is both feeling and action. The author uses 2 Samuel, dealing with King David, to flesh out the differences between the two emotions; Jesus was a constant example of a life devoted to compassion for humankind. This intriguing article offers many insights useful to clergy.

The Authority of the Healer: Healing Stories in the Gospel of John
May 1, 2014 – 12:07 am | Comments Off on The Authority of the Healer: Healing Stories in the Gospel of John
The Authority of the Healer: Healing Stories in the Gospel of John

by Peggy Adrien

The Gospel according to John starts off powerfully by identifying Jesus as the Word/as God. Within his Gospel, John cites only two healing stories—a cripple and a blind man. Here the author links the healer, Jesus, with the Old Testament demonstrating how these healings supported John’s opening statement about Jesus.

Is There Discipline in Our Discipleship?
February 1, 2014 – 6:14 pm | Comments Off on Is There Discipline in Our Discipleship?
Is There Discipline in Our Discipleship?

by Joseph Crockett

Important for transforming non-adherents into students, followers, and apprentices of a leader, discipline is a necessary, though not the only important, task in the life of a disciple. Jesus and others make clear the crucial connections between discipline and discipleship.

“Follow Me”…“He Is Going before You to Galilee”
February 1, 2014 – 6:12 pm | Comments Off on “Follow Me”…“He Is Going before You to Galilee”
“Follow Me”…“He Is Going before You to Galilee”

by Jae Won Lee

Human beings are born out of relationships, live in relationship to others, and are remembered through those relationships. Christian discipleship urges us to return to the foundational relationship between Jesus and his disciples, to reflect upon it in our social locations, and embody it in our daily life.

Journeying With Jesus: Discipleship in the Context of Diversity and Transnationalism
February 1, 2014 – 6:11 pm | Comments Off on Journeying With Jesus: Discipleship in the Context of Diversity and Transnationalism
Journeying With Jesus:  Discipleship in the Context of Diversity and Transnationalism

by Moses O. Biney

In an era of cultural and religious diversity and transnationalism, how can faithful discipleship accommodate or at least co-exist with cultural and religious differences? This perennial question calls for new answers, and this article is a move in that direction.

Imitation Is the Most Sincere Form of…Discipleship
February 1, 2014 – 6:10 pm | Comments Off on Imitation Is the Most Sincere Form of…Discipleship
Imitation Is the Most Sincere Form of…Discipleship

by Christopher S. Peet

The author’s “hermeneutic of suspicion” is aroused when reading a text that seems to demand unquestioning obedience. However, while Dietrich Bonhoeffer makes it clear that in his opinion unquestioning obedience is at the heart of true discipleship, the author offers other suggestions.

Call and Discipleship
February 1, 2014 – 6:09 pm | Comments Off on Call and Discipleship
Call and Discipleship

by Jennifer M. van Zandt

There are growing numbers of “Spiritual but Not Religious” people leaving the institutional church for their own rituals and ways of relating to God. Too many people in formal churches are assisting in this slow death by focusing on Attendance, Budget, and Children instead of making Disciples.